Posts Tagged ‘Abbas’

Israels Antwort auf neue Friedensgespräche

Freitag, April 27th, 2012

Der palästinensische Präsident Abbas will Netanjahu zurück an den Verhandlungstisch holen, um die Friedensgespräche wieder aufzunehmen und fordert einen Stopp des Siedlungsbaus. Israel antwortet mit der Legalisierung von drei illegalen Außenposten: „Israel responds to Palestinian call to restart talks by legalizing three West Bank settlement outposts“Mondoweiss, 26. April 2012.

Welche Optionen hat Abbas vor der UNO?

Dienstag, September 13th, 2011

Ein aktueller Artikel in der taz fasst sehr gut zusammen, welche verschiedenen Optionen Abbas vor der UNO hat: “Der unklare Staat“taz, 13. September 2011.

junge welt zu den ‚Palestine Papers‘

Dienstag, Februar 1st, 2011

Knut Mellenthin zeigt in seinem zumindest auf den ersten Blick hervorragend recherchierten Artikel (I like Footnotes) die Hintergründe der abgebrochenen Friedensverhandlungen, der „Palestine Papers“ und ob der Vorwurf der PA, die Veröffentlichung wäre eine Kampagne gegen sie, nicht teilweise gerechtfertigt sei: „Aussichtslose Verhandlungen“junge welt, 1. Februar 2011

Die „Palestine Papers“

Freitag, Januar 28th, 2011

Eine ausgezeichnete Zusammenfassung, worum es sich bei den durch Al Jazeera veröffentlichten „Palestine Papers“ handelt, bringt Spiegelfechter: „Die Palestine-Papers“

Welcher Gesprächspartner?

Freitag, Januar 7th, 2011

Netanyahu hat auch nach deutschsprachigen Presseberichten zufolge angeboten, sofort wieder den Friedensprozess mit den Palästinensern aufzunehmen. Er wolle verhandeln, bis „weißer Rauch“ aufsteige. 1 Diese auch in anderen Ländern verbreitete Nachricht kommentiert Coteret wie folgt:

“Rejectionist front”: Maariv details Netanyahu’s refusal to directly negotiate with PA

As Israel’s diplomatic position erodes and the Palestinian Authority’s campaign for the unilateral recognition of a state in the 1967 borders gains ground, the demand for “direct negotiations” has become a central talking point of  Israeli government spokespeople. Here’s the latest example, from a January 2 Associated Press report:

He [Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu] said he was ready to sit with Abbas, also known as Abu Mazen, for “continuous direct one-on-one negotiations until white smoke is wafting,” an allusion to the Vatican’s custom for announcing a new pope.

“If Abu Mazen agrees to my proposal of directly discussing all the core issues, we will know very quickly if we can reach an agreement,” he said.

This morning’s [January 3] Maariv questions the sincerity of this proposal [full translation at the bottom of this post]:

In the past weeks, Israeli representatives, including Netanyahu, have repeatedly rejected official documents that their Palestinian counterparts have tried to submit to them, with details of the Palestinian positions on all the core issues.  The Israeli representatives are completely unwilling to discuss, read or touch these documents, not to speak of submitting an equivalent Israeli document with the Israeli positions…This completely contradicts the Israeli position, according to which everything is open for negotiation, and Netanyahu is willing to talk about all the core issues and go into a room with Abu Mazen in order to come out of it with an arrangement.  If this is the case, there is no reason for the Israelis not to willingly accept a review of the Palestinian positions in order to present counter-papers that will make it possible to start bridging the gaps.

Of the examples cited by diplomatic affairs analyst Ben Caspit, one is unambiguously ”direct”:

in a meeting that was held between Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and Abu Mazen, in the prime minister’s official residence in Jerusalem.  It has now become apparent that in this meeting, Abu Mazen brought an official Palestinian document for Netanyahu, consisting of two printed pages, with the proposed Palestinian solution on the two issues that the sides were supposed to discuss at the first stage: Security arrangements and borders.  Netanyahu refused to read or discuss the document.  Abu Mazen is said to have left the document at the Prime Minister’s Residence (so that Netanyahu could read it later).

Another, more recent, incident reveals something of the motivation for the Israeli rejections [emphasis mine]:

in the latest meeting that was held between the two negotiators, Dr. Saeb Erekat from the Palestinian side and Attorney Yitzhak Molcho from the Israeli side.  The meeting was held in Washington a few weeks ago, in the presence of the American mediators.  During the meeting, Erekat surprised Molcho, took an official booklet out of his briefcase bearing the logo of the Palestinian Authority and tried to hand it to Molcho.  When the Israeli inquired as to the content of the booklet, Erekat said that this was, in effect, the detailed and updated Palestinian peace plan, with the detailed Palestinian positions on all the core issues.  Molcho refused to take the booklet or examine it.  According to sources who are informed about what took place there, he said to Erekat, and to the Americans, that he could not touch the Palestinian booklet, read it or take it, because as soon as he would do so, “the government will fall.”

—-

Rejectionist front

Ben Caspit, Maariv, January 3 2010 [front-page; Hebrew original here]

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu announced yesterday that he was willing to discuss all the core issues with Abu Mazen in closed meetings, and said that if he were to go into the room with the Palestinian leader he would sit down and discuss all the issues with him “until white smoke rises.”  Ma’ariv has found that in reality, the situation is the complete opposite: In the past weeks, Israeli representatives, including Netanyahu, have repeatedly rejected official documents that their Palestinian counterparts have tried to submit to them, with details of the Palestinian positions on all the core issues.  The Israeli representatives are completely unwilling to discuss, read or touch these documents, not to speak of submitting an equivalent Israeli document with the Israeli positions.

The most striking case took place in the latest meeting that was held between the two negotiators, Dr. Saeb Erekat from the Palestinian side and Attorney Yitzhak Molcho from the Israeli side.  The meeting was held in Washington a few weeks ago, in the presence of the American mediators.  During the meeting, Erekat surprised Molcho, took an official booklet out of his briefcase bearing the logo of the Palestinian Authority and tried to hand it to Molcho.  When the Israeli inquired as to the content of the booklet, Erekat said that this was, in effect, the detailed and updated Palestinian peace plan, with the detailed Palestinian positions on all the core issues.  Molcho refused to take the booklet or examine it.  According to sources who are informed about what took place there, he said to Erekat, and to the Americans, that he could not touch the Palestinian booklet, read it or take it, because as soon as he would do so, “the government will fall.”

The second case took place in a meeting that was held between Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and Abu Mazen, in the prime minister’s official residence in Jerusalem.  It has now become apparent that in this meeting, Abu Mazen brought an official Palestinian document for Netanyahu, consisting of two printed pages, with the proposed Palestinian solution on the two issues that the sides were supposed to discuss at the first stage: Security arrangements and borders.  Netanyahu refused to read or discuss the document.  Abu Mazen is said to have left the document at the Prime Minister’s Residence (so that Netanyahu could read it later).

The various Palestinian documents that are offered to the Israelis from time to time (there are additional examples besides those listed here), also include Palestinian consent to the presence of a “third party” in the Jordan Valley for a long period after the signing of the agreement.  The Palestinians intend to consent to an American or European military presence, or [a force belonging to] NATO or any other party that is acceptable to Israel, in order to guard the crossings, but as stated above, the Israeli side is completely unwilling to open these documents and discuss the issues.

This completely contradicts the Israeli position, according to which everything is open for negotiation, and Netanyahu is willing to talk about all the core issues and go into a room with Abu Mazen in order to come out of it with an arrangement.  If this is the case, there is no reason for the Israelis not to willingly accept a review of the Palestinian positions in order to present counter-papers that will make it possible to start bridging the gaps.  It appears that the statements made by Netanyahu and his associates are completely devoid of content, and what is closer to the truth is what was said by Yitzhak Molcho in the meeting with Erekat: “As soon as I touch this, the government will fall.”  Incidentally, both sides, Erekat and Molcho, agreed to deny the incident and erase it from the protocol if asked about it, but its existence was cross-checked with many sources.  MK Ahmed Tibi also hinted to this in statements he recently made on the Knesset podium.

The Prime Minister’s Bureau stated: “The report is incorrect.”

  1. Beispiel: NZZ, Welt, und viele mehr. []

Ein Lüftchen aus dem Westen

Dienstag, Dezember 14th, 2010

Spiegel Online spricht von einem scharfen Wind aus dem Westen. Meiner Meinung ist dies aber eher ein schwaches Lüftchen, was der israelischen Regierung aus Europa und der USA entgegenkommt. Akiva Eldar fasst die Entwicklung der letzten Tage im Friedensprozess noch einmal zusammen: „Netanyahu has rejected one too many U.S. packages“Haaretz, 14. Dezember 2010.

Das Ende des Friedensprozesses

Mittwoch, November 24th, 2010

Die Knesset unter Netanyahu hat ein Gesetz beschlossen, welches vorschreibt, dass  bei jeder Entscheidung über einen Abzug aus Ostjerusalem (und den Golanhöhen) eine Volksbefragung durchgeführt werden muss, sollte eine zustimmende Zweidrittelmehrheit im Parlament nicht zustande kommen.1 Das Ende des Friedensprozesses?

Edward Said könnte nun die Fortsetzung seines gleichnamigen Buches schreiben, wäre er nicht vor einigen Jahren verstorben. Ein Friedensprozess, der noch nicht einmal begonnen hatte, wurde damit im Kern erstickt. Denn selbst wenn Netanyahu  irgend etwas mit der palästinensischen Seite aushandeln könnte – es würde, betrachtet man die derzeitige politische Stimmung in Israels Bevölkerung, bei jedem Referendum abgeschmettert werden.2

Praktisch gesehen hat Israel – jedenfalls in Bezug aus Ost-Jerusalem – die Annexion von 1980 nicht nur wiederholt, sondern eine direkte Verhandlung über den Status unmöglich gemacht. Wem das ganze vorsätzliche Scheiternlassen von israelischer Seite noch nicht bewuusst war, der muss spätestens nun erkennen, dass die jetztige israelische Regierung unter den gegebenen Umständen, also jeglichem fehlenden politischen Druck von innen und von außen, nicht Willens ist, Frieden zu schließen. Netanyahu betet „Frieden“ vor, so dass geistig Verwirrte wie Karl Pfeifer dies sogar  glauben und diese Farce auf ihrer Mundorgel fleissig nachflöten. Fehlt nur noch irgendein „Feuerherdt“ in der konkret oder der Jungle World,  der schreibt, Schuld sei die palästinensische Seite, da sie Israel nicht als „jüdisch“ anerkannt hätte. Aber da wird sich sicherlich schon jemand finden.

Stand man bis vor kurzem noch vor der Frage, ob die Friedensverhandlungen noch zu retten seien oder ob die UN nicht eine Alternative darstellen könne, so hat sich erstere Option, also eine direkte Verhandlung mit Israel, mit diesem Gesetz praktisch in Luft aufgelöst. Oder, wie der israelische Journalist Dimi Reider auf +972 schreibt:

The referendum bill put nail-before-last in the two-state process. The last nail will come when the Palestinian Authority implodes, whether for lack of credibility, or for a conscious change of tactic in favour of demanding vote and collective rights within the overarching Israeli government.3

Ins Spiel rückt neben dem immer stärker werdenden Druck in Europa oder den USA nun vor allem wieder die UN. Der Friedensprozess, wie er sich bis jetzt gestaltete, hat sich eher als ein Instrument der Unterdrückung und Annexion erwiesen. Mouin Rabbani schrieb schon dazu auf The Hill, der täglichen US-amerikanischen Kongresszeitung, dass aber nicht nur die UN eine wichtige Alternative zum jetzigen Friedensprozess darstelle. Sondern er rät der palästinensischen Seite, und dabei steht er längst nicht mehr alleine, sich von den Verhandlungen zurückzuziehen. Sie solle dann, wie im Falle Algeriens, nur noch zum Verhandlungstisch zurückkehren, wenn über das endgültige Ende der Besatzung und ihrer praktischen Details geredet würde:

If Palestinians do succeed in putting their house in order – and in this respect their various leaders form a formidable obstacle – one of their first measures should be to withdraw from the current diplomatic framework. They should then announce that – as has been the case with decolonization from Algeria to Zimbabwe – they would agree to negotiate only the mechanisms of a permanent end to the Israeli occupation and the attendant practical details. There would, in other words, be no further discussion of permanent status issues unless and until Israel concedes these have already been resolved by several truckloads of UN resolutions.4

Zusammen mit dem Einbringen einer UN-Resolution, die die Siedlungen und alle Annexionen für illegal erklären würde, zusätzlich gepaart mit dem Druck aus den europäischen Parlamenten und begleitet durch massive Proteste von Aktivisten, würde es der EU und der USA schwer fallen, eine solche Resolution zu missachten.

Eine andere Alternative ist aber auch noch die sog. Einstaatenlösung, über deren Option mehr und mehr auf israelischer, aber vor allem auch auf palästinensischer Seite nachgedacht werden muss und auch wieder vermehrt wird.  Es verhält sich gerade nicht so, dass diese Entwicklung nur eine weitere Hürde innerhalb der Verhandlungen darstellt, wie so viele Zeitungen schrieben.5 Sollte das Gesetz nicht zurückgenommen werden, ist der Friedensprozess in seiner jetztigen Form jedenfalls gescheitert.

  1. Schlag gegen Frieden“ – junge welt, 24.11.2010 []
  2. Vgl. dazu  Susanne Knaul: „Truppenabzug mit Zweidrittelhürde“ – taz, 23. November 2010 []
  3. Knesset decapitates two-state solution – +972, 22. November 2010 []
  4. Mouin Rabbani: „Palestine at the UN: An alternative strategy“ – The Hill, 19.November 2010 []
  5. Vgl. dazu exemplarisch: „Israel legt Hürden für Abzug von Golan-Höhen fest“ – Welt Online, 23. November 2010 []

PLO fordert Abbas zur Einstellung der Gespräche auf

Dienstag, Oktober 5th, 2010

Vor einiges Tagen  hatten verschiedenste deutsche Pressestimmen noch berichtet, dass der Baustopp nicht verlängert wurde. Über die Reaktion bei den Palästinensern schwieg sich die deutsche Presse  jedoch weitgehend aus. Der Independent berichtete dagegen schon am Sonntag ausführlich darüber, dass die PLO Abbas auffordert, die Gespräche abzubrechen. „PLO demands settlements freeze before peace talks“ – Independent, 3. Oktober 2010.

Abbas: „Die Zweite Intifada war einer unserer schlimmsten Fehler“

Mittwoch, Mai 26th, 2010

Der palästinensische Präsident in einem Interview mit einem ägyptischen Fernsehsender: Ein Frieden könne in weniger als einer Woche erreicht werden, wenn Israel nur „will“. Haaretz, 26.5.2010